EPCHS Band

Focus on the Students

Famous Composers

The purpose of this page is to give students a starting point to discover some of the most famous and influential composers in classical music.  Listen to some new music, find your tastes, and maybe discover a new appreciation for classical music!  The list is in alphabetical order by composer's last name.
  • Johann Sebastian Bach
  • Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Johannes Brahms
  • Frédéric Chopin
  • Aaron Copland
  • Antonín Dvořák
  • George Frederic Handel
  • Joseph Haydn
  • Franz Liszt
  • Felix Mendelssohn
  • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
  • Sergei Rachmaninoff
  • Franz Schubert
  • Jean Sibelius
  • Richard Strauss
  • Peter Tchaikovsky
  • Antonio Vivaldi
  • Carl Maria von Weber
  • Richard Wagner

Johann Sebastian Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach (31 March 1685 – 28 July 1750) was a German composer, organist, harpsichordist, violist, and violinist whose sacred and secular works for choir, orchestra, and solo instruments drew together the strands of the Baroque period and brought it to its ultimate maturity. Although he did not introduce new forms, he enriched the prevailing German style with a robust contrapuntal technique, an unrivaled control of harmonic  organization, and the adaptation of rhythms, forms and textures from abroad, particularly from Italy and France.  (Read more: Wikipedia)

Johannes Brahms

Johannes Brahms (7 May 1833 – 3 April 1897) was a German composer and pianist, and one of the leading musicians of the Romantic period. Born in Hamburg, Brahms spent much of his professional life in Vienna, Austria, where he was a leader of the musical scene. In his lifetime, Brahms' popularity and influence were considerable; following a comment by the nineteenth-century conductor Hans von Bülow, he is sometimes grouped with Johann Sebastian Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven as one of the Three Bs.

Frédéric Chopin

Frédéric François Chopin (1810 – 1849) was a Polish composer, virtuoso pianist, and music teacher, of French–Polish parentage. He was one of the great masters of Romantic music.  (Read more: Wikipedia)

Antonín Dvořák

Antonín Leopold Dvořák (1841 – 1904) was a Czech composer of Romantic music, who employed the idioms of the folk music of Moravia and his native Bohemia. His works include operas, symphonic, choral and chamber music. His best-known works include his New World Symphony, the Slavonic Dances, "American" String Quartet, and Cello Concerto in B minor.  (Read more: Wikipedia)

George Frederic Handel

George Frideric Handel (23 February 1685 – 14 April 1759) was a German-British Baroque composer, famous for his operas, oratorios, and concertos. Handel was born in Germany in the same year as Johann Sebastian Bach and Domenico Scarlatti. He received critical musical training in Italy before settling in London and becoming a naturalized British subject. His works include Messiah, Water Music, and Music for the Royal Fireworks. He was strongly influenced by the great composers of the Italian Baroque and the middle-German polyphonic choral tradition. Handel's music was well-known to composers including Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. (Read more: Wikipedia)

Joseph Haydn

Franz Joseph Haydn (31 March 1732 – 31 May 1809), known as Joseph Haydn, was an Austrian composer, one of the most prolific and prominent composers of the Classical period. He is often called the "Father of the Symphony" and "Father of the String Quartet" because of his important contributions to these forms. He was also instrumental in the development of the piano trio and in the evolution of sonata form.  At the time of his death, he was one of the most celebrated composers in Europe.  He was also a close friend of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and a teacher of Ludwig van Beethoven.  (Read more: Wikipedia)

Franz Liszt

Franz Liszt (1811 – 1886) was a 19th century Hungarian composer, virtuoso pianist and teacher.  Liszt became renowned throughout Europe during the 19th century for his great skill as a performer. He was said by his contemporaries to have been the most technically advanced pianist of his age and perhaps the greatest pianist of all time. He was also an important and influential composer, a notable piano teacher, a conductor who contributed significantly to the modern development of the art, and a benefactor to other composers and performers, notably Richard Wagner, Hector Berlioz, Camille Saint-Saëns, Edvard Grieg and Alexander Borodin.  (Read more: Wikipedia)

Felix Mendelssohn

Felix Mendelssohn (3 February 1809 – 4 November 1847) was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early Romantic period. He was recognized early as a musical prodigy, but his parents were cautious and did not seek to capitalize on his abilities.  Mendelssohn's work includes symphonies, concerti, oratorios, piano music and chamber music. His most-performed works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the Hebrides Overture, his Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and anti-Semitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has now been recognised and re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the Romantic era.  (Read more: Wikipedia)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27 January 1756 – 5 December 1791), was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era. He composed over 600 works, many acknowledged as pinnacles of symphonic, concertante, chamber, piano, operatic, and choral music. He is among the most endearingly popular of classical composers. (Read more: Wikipedia)

Franz Schubert

Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer.  Although he died at an early age, Schubert was tremendously prolific. He wrote some 600 Lieder, nine symphonies (including the famous "Unfinished Symphony"), liturgical music, operas, some incidental music, and a large body of chamber and solo piano music. Appreciation of his music during his lifetime was limited, but interest in Schubert's work increased dramatically in the decades following his death at the age of 31. Franz Liszt, Robert Schumann, Johannes Brahms and Felix Mendelssohn, among others, discovered and championed his works in the 19th Century. Today, Schubert is admired as one of the leading exponents of the early Romantic era in music and he remains one of the most frequently performed composers. (Read more: Wikipedia)

Antonio Vivaldi

Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678 – 1741), was an Italian Baroque composer, priest, and virtuoso violinist, born in Venice. Vivaldi is recognized as one of the greatest Baroque composers, and his influence during his lifetime was widespread over Europe. Vivaldi is known mainly for composing instrumental concertos, especially for the violin, as well as sacred choral works and over 40 operas. His best known work is a series of violin concertos known as The Four Seasons. (Read more: Wikipedia)

Carl Maria von Weber

Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst von Weber (1786 – 1826) was a German composer, conductor, pianist, guitarist and critic, one of the first significant composers of the Romantic school.  (Read more: Wikipedia)

Richard Wagner

Wilhelm Richard Wagner (1813  – 1883) was a German composer, conductor, theatre director and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or "music dramas", as they were later called). Wagner's compositions, particularly those of his later period, are notable for their complex texture, rich harmonies and orchestration, and the elaborate use of leitmotifs: musical themes associated with individual characters, places, ideas or plot elements. Unlike most other opera composers, Wagner wrote both the music and libretto for every one of his stage works.  (Read more: Wikipedia)

Richard Strauss

Richard Georg Strauss (1864 – 1949) was a leading German composer of the late Romantic and early modern eras. He is known for his operas, which include Der Rosenkavalier and Salome; his Lieder, especially his Four Last Songs; and his tone poems and orchestral works, such as Death and Transfiguration, Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks, Also sprach Zarathustra, An Alpine Symphony, and Metamorphosen. Strauss, along with Gustav Mahler, represents the late flowering of German Romanticism after Richard Wagner, in which pioneering subtleties of orchestration are combined with an advanced harmonic style.  (Read more: Wikipedia)

Jean Sibelius

Jean Sibelius (1865 – 1957) was a Finnish composer of the later Romantic period whose music played an important role in the formation of the Finnish national identity. His mastery of the orchestra has been described as "prodigious."  The core of Sibelius's oeuvre is his set of seven symphonies.

EPCHS Band Members

Contact us

Adam Schneblin
Director of Bands | Conductor, Symphonic Band
309.694.8300 | [email protected]
1401 E. Washington Street, East Peoria, IL 61611

More information

Upcoming Events

Click on an event name for more information.

Follow us

  

Online resources for the EPCHS Band.

Search Our Site

Loading